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GA Welcomes Attorney, Garrett Lewis (Video)

Transcript:

Jim Browne:  Hey, welcome to Goodin Abernathy. I’m attorney Jim Browne. We have a new member to our group, Garrett Lewis. He is a young attorney, and I thought we would spend a little time with him so you get to know who he is and what he can do for you.  Come on in, Garrett.

Garrett Lewis: Alright, glad to be here Jim.

Jim Browne:  Where are you from, Garrett?

Garrett Lewis:  So, I’m actually from the South Bend area. I practiced there for a couple years before moving down here.

Jim Browne: What time of law did you focus on?

Garrett Lewis: We did Real Estate; we did Torts, which is contracts, defamation, things like that; and intellectual property, which is sort of copyrights, trademarks and patents.

Jim Browne: Do you have a typical client that you helped with the intellectual property?

Garrett Lewis: Yea, we dealt with small businesses. We had a few global businesses that we worked with and a lot of individual clients  with patents and trademarks.

Jim Browne: What about people with inventions?

Garrett Lewis: All, all the time.

Jim Browne: Awesome.

Garrett Lewis: Yea, some that we knew weren’t going to anywhere right out of the gate and some that where very successful.

Jim Browne: That’s great. Where you go to school?

Garrett Lewis: So I went to Purdue and I studied business first, “Boiler up!”  And then after that, I went straight from Purdue to Valparaiso for law school.

Jim Browne: I’m happy you joined us, remind me when did you start here?

Garrett Lewis: I started in April of this year.

Jim Browne: Right in the middle of the Covid.

Garrett Lewis: Right in the middle of it, right.

Jim Browne: And what areas of law are you focusing on right now?

Garrett Lewis: So right now, we still do Real Estate work but also do Personal Injury, Workers Comp and sort of ADA and EEOC Discrimination.

Jim Browne: Well, what’s that? I mean is that employment law type of work?

Garrett Lewis: Yea predominantly. Yep.

Jim Browne: And you are helping clients – individuals with their questions about discrimination? Tell us about that for a second.

Garrett Lewis: Yeah, so it sort of depends – when it comes to the ADA – businesses, for example, have legal obligation to provide reasonable accommodations and….

Jim Browne: so, there are seven core areas – age, race, religion, sexual discrimination, physical disabilities – those are things that you’re focusing on?

Garrett Lewis: Correct

Jim Browne: Great. You’ve already had a jury trial in that area… and what court was it in?

Garrett Lewis: So that was actually in the southern district in the…

Jim Browne: A federal court?

Garrett Lewis: A federal court, yea.

Jim Browne: And that trial, what was it about?

Garrett Lewis: So, that case was about a woman who was working at a grocery store for about 12 years and because of her chronic conditions and disabilities, she needed to be able to use a chair, as necessary.

Jim Browne: And the new employer said “No, you can’t use the chair.”

Garrett Lewis: That’s exactly right.

Jim Browne: So, it’s something probably a pretty easy fix.

Garrett Lewis: It was a very easy fix.

Jim Browne: You had a nice result with that jury trial?

Garrett Lewis: We did.

Jim Browne: You where able to learn some things.

Garrett Lewis: Yes.

Jim Browne: Give me one thing that stood out to you about that process.

Garrett Lewis: Well, first thing is you know maybe as a last resort everybody paid attention on the jury, which was nice – and whereas outside of the court room, Covid has sort of made remote working a little bit more convenient, inside the courtroom it’s made it much more of a challenge.

Jim Browne: I understand, so you’re preparing and you’re going to teach us old guys what to do about those technological challenges right?

Garrett Lewis: Yep.

Jim Browne: Well, I’m glad you’re on board Garrett. If you have questions about any of those areas of law please call us at Goodin Abernathy. A lot of your questions can be answered by phone, and we really care about the quality and responsiveness of our work, so please call us at 317-843-2606. You’ll get in touch with whichever attorney probably best suits the area of law you’re looking for, and we appreciate you tuning in to Goodin Abernathy.

 

Can the Government or My Employer Require I Receive the COVID-19 Vaccine?


It is December 17, 2020, and this week was the beginning of vaccine distribution in the United States.

Many people are asking, “Can the government or my employer require me to get the Covid-19 Vaccine?

The simple answer is YES, but the likelihood of that happening is going to depend on a lot of factors, and it is not likely that the FEDERAL government would issue such a mandate.

Historically, states have had the right to mandate vaccines in order to ensure safety of the public. However, experts believe that it is very unlikely it will happen.

What is more likely is that employers and states will condition return or access to workplaces, public schools and universities upon getting the vaccine. Currently, all 50 states and Washington DC have laws requiring certain vaccines for students, but there are exceptions for personal, moral or other beliefs.

The industries most likely to mandate vaccines are going to be those most at risk for contracting the disease, such as those who work in HEALTHCARE, EDUCATION, PUBLIC SAFETY. Another important factor will be: AVAILABILITY OF VACCINE.

Currently, the available Coronavirus vaccines have been given Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA. By the time the vaccines receive full FDA approval, which could take months. A lot will depend on how widespread the current vaccine has been distributed.

It is not clear if employers could legally mandate a vaccine that is only approved for Emergency Use. However, it would be very unusual to mandate a vaccine that has not been fully licensed and approved by the FDA. Right now, the consensus seems to be to encourage as many people as possible to voluntarily receive the vaccine. Assuming large numbers of people get vaccinated, there is a much less likely chance that there will be mandates by states or employers.

On the other hand, once the vaccine is approved by the FDA, if the number of people vaccinated is still too low to be effective, AND there is an available supply of the vaccine, we should probably expect to see some mandates.

As with any vaccine, there will be exceptions to those mandates; for example: pregnant women, people with disabilities, or those who hold deeply-rooted religious convictions.

So, what does that mean for you? To be vaccinated is a personal decision for each of us. I can tell you that I will be volunteering to get the vaccine as soon as it becomes available, and I look forward to putting an end to this deadly disease.

If you have questions about the vaccine as it relates to your employment, please feel free to contact me, Chip Clark, for a free consultation.

Also see, “What You Should Know About COVID-19 and the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and Other EEO Laws.”

Discrimination Against LGBTQ Workers – Bostock v. Clayton County

Discrimination Against LGBTQ Workers – Bostock v. Clayton County

Hi. My name is Chip Clark, and I am a partner at Goodin Abernathy, where I focus primarily on the rights of employees.

On June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in the case of Bostock v. Clayton County, holding that federal law prohibits employment discrimination against LGBTQ workers.

Interestingly, conservative Justice, Neil M. Gorsuch, wrote for the majority in the 6-to-3 ruling, stating:

“An employer who fires an individual merely for being gay or transgender defies the law.”

The case concerned Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars employment discrimination based on race, religion, national origin and sex. The question for the justices was whether that last prohibition — discrimination “because of sex”— applies to many millions of gay and transgender workers.

Justice Gorsuch wrote that it did.

“An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex,”

he wrote.

Gorsuch goes on to say,

“It is impossible to discriminate against a person for being homosexual or transgender without discriminating against that individual based on sex.”

The court considered two sets of cases. The first concerned a pair of lawsuits from gay men who said they were fired because of their sexual orientation: Bostock v. Clayton County, Ga., No. 17-1618, and Altitude Express Inc. v. Zarda, No. 17-1623. The second was based on gender identity. In that case, Aimee Stephens, was a funeral director working near Detroit when she was fired in 2013 after announcing she would begin living as a woman. Sadly, Aimee died in May at the age of 59, not living to see her heroic contribution to this landmark decision. Her willingness to stand up to her employer now makes it it illegal for employers to terminate an employee based on gender identity.

In 27 states, there are no explicit statewide laws protecting people from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity in employment, housing and public accommodations, according to Freedom For All Americans, a bipartisan campaign to protect LGBTQ people from discrimination. An employee in one of these states conceivably could be fired for being gay or transgender – and would have no guaranteed rights against it.

In 21 other states, plus the District of Columbia, employees had full protection from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in employment, housing and public accommodation.

There are 8.1 million LGBTQ workers ages 16 and older in the USA, according to the institute. About 3.9 million of those work in those 27 states.

What About Discrimination in Small Businesses with Fewer than 15 Employees?

Unfortunately, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act only prohibits employment discrimination by employers with 15 or more employees.

Conceivably, a business with fewer than 15 employees in certain parts of Indiana could still legally fire somebody on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, unless there is a city or county ordinance prohibiting such discrimination.

Here, in the City of Indianapolis, we have had an ordinance that prohibits such discrimination since 2005. Other Indiana communities have laws to protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation, but not gender identity, so there still remains a patchwork of laws if your employer has fewer than 15 employees.

What Should Workers Do If They Are Fired Based on Sexual Orientation or Gender Identity?

If you’re fired on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, the first call you should make is to an attorney who knows and understands this area of the law. We can assist you with filing a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission or the local agency that enforces state or local anti-discrimination laws. This is the first step in filing a lawsuit in Federal or State Court against an employer who discriminates.

If you have questions about your rights as a member of the LGBTQ community, please call me for free, no obligation, consultation.

Business Interruption During COVID-19 & Commercial Insurance

Business Interruption During COVID-19 & Commercial Insurance

The economic impact on small businesses due to COVID-19 is undeniable. Further, the uncertainty surrounding the length of the shut-down and the availability of funds for relief loans has left many business owners wondering whether the business interruption coverage in their commercial general liability policy will provide coverage to offset financial losses incurred. Politicians in Washington have asked insurers to justify the refusal to pay out claims, and already class action lawsuits are being filed around the country against insurance companies.

When assessing whether business interruption coverage in a commercial general liability insurance policy applies to economic losses caused by COVID-19, the answer is—it depends on the particular policy. Generally speaking, however, most business interruption clauses require the loss of business income to be caused by direct physical loss or damage to the property that prevents the business from operating. Although it appears the COVID-19 virus can survive on surfaces for up to five (5) days, it is doubtful that this phenomenon would qualify as direct physical loss or damage to the property or be of sufficient duration to trigger most insurance clauses. In addition, many commercial general liability insurance policies exclude coverage for losses caused by viral contamination.
On the contrary, it is possible that the specific wording and coverages in any particular policy may provide coverage. For example, businesses operating in the food service industry or the hospitality industry may have specific clauses in their respective insurance policies that relate to losses caused by viruses or alternative business interruption losses like event cancellations. Consequently, all business owners who have sustained financial losses due to COVID-19 are encouraged to examine their insurance contracts.

If you need legal assistance in these matters, please contact us for a free initial legal consultation.

Indianapolis Celebrates Day of the Dead

Indianapolis Celebrates Day of the Dead

Volunteers with NOPAL Cultural promoting their Dia de los Muertos event last weekend at the Indy 11 game

Volunteers with NOPAL Cultural promoting their Dia de los Muertos event last weekend at the Indy 11 game.

Our good friends at NOPAL Cultural have a special celebration of Day of the Dead planned for this Saturday, October 31, 2015 from 11am to 5pm at the Eiteljorg Museum in downtown Indianapolis.  The event will highlight the exhibition of ofrendas and altares made by local artists and civic groups to honor their loved ones.  There will be special musical performances, art projects, a marketplace and a Catrina parade.  The event is free and open to the public.  You can find out more at the event page on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/events/770875693040591/  We hope to see you there!

How does your family remember your loved ones?  How do you celebrate Day of the Dead?  Let us know in the comments!

https://www.facebook.com/NopalCultural/videos/vb.379208648824628/916114328467388/?type=2&theater

“U Drive. U Text. U Pay.”

The U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx kicked off the National Distracted Driving Enforcement Campaign across the United States entitled: “U Drive. U Text. U Pay.”

This catchy phrase is simple and to the point when only a financial loss is considered; however, the “Pay” portion also includes the emotional element people go through when involved in a motor vehicle accident. Per statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10 percent of traffic accidents resulting in death and 18 percent of personal injury traffic accidents were due to distracted driving. 2013 had 244 teenagers lose their life due to distracted driving. The emotional toll that is taken on people injured and their friends and family is impossible to quantify. The guilt the distracted driver will experience and “pay” is also impossible to quantify.

It is important for all of us to put down our cell phones and concentrate on our driving. For adults, it is also important to set a good example for our children and teenagers that a cell phone should not be used while driving, as pretty soon, they will also be behind the wheel as an inexperienced and novice driver.

Be safe and put down the cell phone while driving.